Managing the Process of Change

With Andy Coley

Elevate

Video length 7 Chapters

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Overview

All change is good, right? If it's dealt with in the right way it can be, however, if managed incorrectly it can prove one of the biggest causes of anxiety and disruption. Take this course to learn how you can manage your change management programme, engage with different stakeholders and run effective meetings.

Outcomes

    • How you create impetus for change via the major stakeholders
    • How the individuals involved will have very different motivators and drivers for the project and how you communicate with them
    • How you can run an effective change meeting
    • The fundamentals of giving and receiving feedback as you’re going along
    • What are the biggest mistakes when it comes to implementing change

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Introduction

Hi my name is Andy Coley, Confidence Expert and NLP Trainer and I run a company called Beyond Training Solutions with my business partner Jo Wilson.  I’m really pleased to be able to welcome you to this course all about how to manage the process of change in the workplace.

Change is inevitable both within organisations and in life in general and how you manage change within your business can make the difference between the success and failure of a project. 

I work in-house with organisations to help facilitate change projects, though frequently this is once they’ve already tried to implement the change project themselves first.

Unfortunately, they’ve not always approached the project with the proper consultations and the full impact on all the stakeholders was not necessarily fully thought through, so my work can end up being part facilitation and part handling conflict by this point.

To create an online course that gives you the fundamentals of the way we help organisations manage change so that you have the opportunity of utilising some of these tools within your own change projects.

I’m going to make an assumption that we’re dealing with workplace change, but these principles can be applied to any area of your life.

Jo and I worked with a team of 80 staff from a community hospital in Essex a few years ago and as a result of the brainstorming sessions we did, both the staff and management wanted to make changes around the hospital. 

These ranged from the way that they handled the patient records through to ordering the correct supplies for the day theatre and even looking at implementing better signage for patients. 

Some great ideas came out of the preliminary sessions and the enthusiastic management team, leapt on some of these and said “yes, that’s brilliant, let’s put them in place right away”.

We’d deliberately mixed the cohorts up, so that clinical and administrative staff were together, along with the senior management team so there was a whole cross-section of the hospital in each session. 

When the management team said that they were going to put the great ideas into place, we could see that not all the staff were convinced that the solutions first mentioned were the best ones.  We facilitated process flow walk-throughs and checked in with all the relevant stakeholders to iron out any concerns.  Once everyone had been consulted and had offered their perspective, refined ideas were then implemented.

As a result, a much better way forward was found and several processes were improved from inventory restocking through to the way they communicated with the patients. And because they’d all been an integral part in the process change there was almost no resistance to the implementation.

All change is good, right?

Well presumably for one of the stakeholders the answer is yes, otherwise it seems like an odd thing to do; change for change’s sake. But when the communication around what is happening is handled badly it can create a high-level of anxiety amongst the stakeholders.

One of the largest causes of anxiety is that some of the people involved simply don’t know what will happen.

  • What’s going to change.
  • How the change will take place.
  • How it’ll impact them. 

They could become easily stressed out, emotional or even hostile to the changes because they are not fully aware of the changes from their perspective and assume the worst.

That said, some change projects really will have an adverse impact on your workforce and this could impact on their employment status, benefits or other component of their current contract.  

Reducing anxiety in staff through honest communication is really important for everyone’s mental health and is something we’ll be covering later on.

During this course we’ll be looking at:

  • How you create impetus for change via the major stakeholders
  • How the individuals involved will have very different motivators and drivers for the project and how you communicate with them
  • How you can run an effective change meeting
  • The fundamentals of giving and receiving feedback as you’re going along
  • What are the biggest mistakes when it comes to implementing change

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